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Paint Mixing Rooms

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As you can from our photos, paint mixing rooms come in all shapes and sizes varying from self-designed purpose-built rooms, OEM units, semi-detached booths and even ex-shipping containers. The requirements can vary for each depending on the type of product, how much product you've got stored on-site and the possible electrical ignition sources. We specialise in inspecting such installations, providing advice and helping you to gain or renew your annual location test certificate.

In response to the many enquiries we've had particularly of self-built facilities owners, we have reproduced the following information leaftlet...

When you're ready, call us, I know we can help...

(Reproduced from - http://www.building.govt.nz/codewords-22-11)
There are two types of spray booths and paint mixing rooms: those fitted to the building structure, and stand-alone units that may be inside or outside a building. Spray booths and paint mixing rooms, whether part of a building or stand-alone, are buildings in their own right under section 8 of the Building Act 2004.
A building consent is therefore required before construction. A compliance schedule for specified systems used, such as mechanical ventilation, will also be required.

How is compliance with the Building Code achieved?
All building work must comply with the Building Code. Therefore, spray booths and paint mixing rooms must comply with the relevant Building Code clauses, including Structure, Durability, Hazardous Substances and Processes, Ventilation and Electricity. Most of these are straightforward. This article offers further comment on complying with Building Code Clauses G9 Electricity, G4 Ventilation and F3 Hazardous Substances and Processes.

Building Code Clause G4 Ventilation
Neither the Verification Method G4/VM1 nor the Acceptable Solution G4/AS1 contains a solution for ventilating spray painting booths, designated spray painting areas and paint mixing rooms. Ventilating these is therefore an alternative solution.

What is reasonable for a building consent authority to accept as a means of compliance?
The applicable standard is AS/NZS 4114.1: 2003 Spray painting booths, designated spray painting areas and paint mixing rooms - Part 1: Design, construction and testing.

Building Code Clause G9 Electricity
Verification method G9/VM1 cites AS/NZS 3000: 2000 Wiring rules as a method for verifying compliance with Building Code Clause G9. This Verification Method became effective on 23 June 2007.
AS/NZS 3000: 2000 in turn references the following Standards.
  • AS/NZS 2381: 2005 Electrical equipment for explosive atmospheres, series of standards.
  • AS/NZS 2381.1: 2005 Electrical equipment for explosive atmospheres - Selection, installation and maintenance Part 1: General references
  • AS/NZS 4114.1: 2003 Spray painting booths, designated spray painting areas and paint mix rooms - Part 1: Design, construction and testing
  • AS/NZS 4114.2: 2003 Spray painting booths, designated spray painting areas and paint mix rooms - Part 2: Installation and maintenance.

F3 Hazardous Substances and Processes and hazardous substances legislation
Compliance with Building Code Clause F3 Hazardous Substances and Processes and hazardous substances legislation can be achieved by complying with the Hazardous Substances (Dangerous Goods and Scheduled Toxic Substances) Transfer Notice 2006, which amends the Hazardous Substances (Dangerous Goods and Scheduled Toxic Substances) Transfer Notice 2004. The 2004 Notice refers to AS/NZS 4114 for paint mixing rooms.

Specified Systems
Mechanical ventilation is a specified system and must therefore be included on compliance schedules for spray booths and paint mixing rooms. A suitable standard for maintaining and testing is AS/NZS 4114.2: 2003 Spray painting booths, designated spray painting areas and paint mix rooms - Part 2: Installation and maintenance.
 
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